Special interest groups

U.S. Census Director Steven Dillingham departs a census news conference to urge Arizonans to participate in the nation's once-a-decade population count Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020, in Phoenix. Ending the 2020 census at the end of September instead of the end of October, could cost Florida and Montana congressional seats and result in Texas, Florida, Arizona, Georgia, and North Carolina losing $500 million in federal funding for healthcare for its neediest residents. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, Pool)
October 27, 2020 - 6:33 am
Now that the Supreme Court has allowed the Trump administration to end the 2020 census count, the courts should not interfere with efforts to meet a year-end deadline for turning in numbers used for divvying up congressional seats by state, Department of Justice attorneys said in court papers ahead...
Read More
FILE - This Sunday, April 5, 2020, file photo shows an envelope containing a 2020 census letter mailed to a U.S. resident in Detroit. On Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2020, the U.S. Supreme Court stopped the once-a-decade head count of every U.S. resident from continuing through the end of October. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
October 21, 2020 - 2:08 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Technology and working around the clock should allow the U.S. Census Bureau to crunch numbers from the 2020 census in half the time originally allotted, but if the work isn't completed by a year-end deadline, the statistical agency will take the extra time needed to finish it,...
Read More
Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett listens during a confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP, Pool)
October 14, 2020 - 3:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (all times local): 6:05 p.m. Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court confirmation hearing has gaveled to a close for the day, wrapping up three days of testimony. Acknowledging the deeply divided...
Read More
Hundreds of people wait in line for early voting on Monday, Oct. 12, 2020, in Marietta, Georgia. Eager voters have waited six hours or more in the former Republican stronghold of Cobb County, and lines have wrapped around buildings in solidly Democratic DeKalb County. (AP Photo/Ron Harris)
October 13, 2020 - 11:46 am
ATLANTA (AP) — More than 128,000 Georgians went to the polls Monday, a record for the first day of early voting in the state, according to the secretary of state's office. The high turnout surpassed the nearly 91,000 votes cast on the first day of early voting in 2016 and left eager voters waiting...
Read More
A line forms outside of the State Farm Arena for early voting on Monday, Oct. 12, 2020, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
October 12, 2020 - 2:20 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — The chance to cast ballots on Georgia's first day of in-person early voting Monday had thousands of people waiting for hours to make their voices heard. Eager voters endured waits of six hours or more in Cobb County, which was once solidly Republican but has voted for Democrats in...
Read More
FILE - In this Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020 file photo, Applications for mail-in ballots are seen at a satellite election office at Temple University's Liacouras Center in Philadelphia. Local election clerks can’t start verifying mailed-in ballots in Pennsylvania until Election Day and in Michigan until the day before, which the secretary of state says is not enough time. This means millions of mailed-in ballots in the two key presidential battleground states will not be tallied for days after the election, potentially showing Trump with a tenuous lead there the so-called “red mirage” until all those votes are recorded. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)
October 05, 2020 - 9:07 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — If a ballot is tossed because of some issue — maybe a missing signature or it got damaged — will the voter be notified that the ballot's been invalidated? And can the voter cast a new ballot? This is a tough one — because the rules vary from state to state. The National Conference...
Read More
A sign indicates a drive-through ballot drop off location at the 700 Lavaca Parking Garage in Austin, Texas, on Thursday Oct. 1, 2020, shortly after an order was announced by Gov. Greg Abbott restricting such drop off locations. Civil rights and voter advocacy groups have filed a federal lawsuit seeking to block an order by Gov. Abbott that dramatically reduced the number of drop-off locations for mail ballots. The lawsuit filed late Thursday could be the first of many legal challenges against Abbott’s order that assigns just one drop-off location in each of Texas' 254 counties and allows poll watchers to observe ballot deliveries. (Jay Janner)/Austin American-Statesman via AP)
October 02, 2020 - 10:41 am
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Civil rights and voter advocacy groups have filed a federal lawsuit seeking to block an order by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott that dramatically reduced the number of drop-off locations for mail ballots. The lawsuit filed late Thursday could be the first of many legal challenges...
Read More
FILE - In this Oct. 19, 2018 file photo, U.S. Attorney David Freed speaks at a news conference at the Centre County Courthouse Annex in Bellefonte, Pa. Freed's office issued a statement on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020, that nine mailed-in military ballots had been "discarded" by the local election office. The announcement was seized on by President Donald Trump and his supporters. The U.S. attorney's announcement of the investigation Thursday provided few details, but did mention the votes were for Trump. (Abby Drey/Centre Daily Times via AP, File)
September 25, 2020 - 10:45 pm
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The news release from a U.S. attorney in Pennsylvania was provocative: Nine mailed-in military ballots had been “discarded” by the local election office in a swing county of one of the most important presidential battleground states. All of them were marked for President...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 3, 2020, file photo, a worker prepares tabulators for the upcoming election at the Wake County Board of Elections in Raleigh, N.C. The coronavirus pandemic is forcing millions of American voters worried about their health to scramble to vote by mail for the first time. But a requirement in a handful of states, including presidential battleground North Carolina and Wisconsin, that a witness or notary public sign a ballot envelope is tripping up some voters early. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, file)
September 25, 2020 - 10:05 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — As the pandemic prompts a surge in voting by mail, voters in a handful of states, including the presidential battlegrounds of North Carolina and Wisconsin, are facing a requirement that already is tripping up thousands — the need to have a witness sign their ballot envelope. A...
Read More
FILE - In this Feb. 26, 2020 file photo, using both the English and Spanish language, a sign points potential voters to an official polling location during early voting in Dallas. Getting enough people to staff polling places amid the coronavirus pandemic is a challenge in many states. The virus’ disproportionate impact on Latinos has made the task of recruiting Spanish-speakers even more difficult. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)
September 19, 2020 - 6:52 am
PHOENIX (AP) — The national Mi Familia Vota organization has long been involved in voting rights issues and other matters of civic engagement, but this year it's added a new initiative: Recruiting bilingual poll workers. The Phoenix-based group is joining advocacy organizations, nonprofits and even...
Read More

Pages