Scientific publishing

FILE - In this Thursday, April 23, 2020 file screen grab taken from video issued by Britain's Oxford University, showing a person being injected as part of the first human trials in the UK to test a potential coronavirus vaccine, untaken by Oxford University in England. A key researcher at the University of Oxford says scientists expect to report results from the late-stage trials of their COVID-19 vaccine by Christmas. Dr. Andrew Pollard, an expert in pediatric infection and immunity at Oxford, said Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020 that research was slowed by low infection rates over the summer but the Phase III trials are now accumulating the data needed to report results. (Oxford University Pool via AP, File)
November 19, 2020 - 4:20 am
LONDON (AP) — University of Oxford scientists expect to report results from the late-stage trials of their COVID-19 vaccine by Christmas, a key researcher said Thursday as he discussed the team’s latest findings. Dr. Andrew Pollard, an expert in pediatric infection and immunity at Oxford, said...
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FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2018 photo provided by NASA, Hurricane Florence churns over the Atlantic Ocean heading for the U.S. east coast as seen from the International Space Station. Astronaut Alexander Gerst, who shot the photo, tweeted: "Ever stared down the gaping eye of a category 4 hurricane? It's chilling, even from space." (Alexander Gerst/ESA/NASA via AP)
November 11, 2020 - 12:17 pm
Hurricanes are keeping their staying power longer once they make landfall, spreading more inland destruction, according to a new study. Warmer ocean waters from climate change are likely making hurricanes lose power more slowly after landfall, because they act as a reserve fuel tank for moisture,...
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September 30, 2020 - 5:20 am
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say genes that some people have inherited from their Neanderthal ancestors may increase the likelihood of suffering severe forms of COVID-19. A study by European scientists published Wednesday by the journal Nature identifies a cluster of genes that are linked to a higher...
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September 28, 2020 - 1:47 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A network of salty ponds may be gurgling beneath Mars’ South Pole alongside a large underground lake, raising the prospect of tiny, swimming Martian life. Italian scientists reported their findings Monday, two years after identifying what they believed to be a large...
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Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a roundtable discussion with veterans, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020, at Hillsborough Community College in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
September 15, 2020 - 1:26 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Even though Scientific American had never endorsed a presidential candidate in the magazine's 175-year history, its top editor said Tuesday there was little internal debate over a decision to back Democrat Joe Biden. Editor-in-Chief Laura Helmuth said President Donald Trump's...
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In this handout photo taken on Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, and provided by Russian Direct Investment Fund, a new vaccine is on display at the Nikolai Gamaleya National Center of Epidemiology and Microbiology in Moscow, Russia. Russia on Tuesday, Aug. 11 became the first country to approve a coronavirus vaccine for use in tens of thousands of its citizens despite international skepticism about injections that have not completed clinical trials and were studied in only dozens of people for less than two months. (Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr/ Russian Direct Investment Fund via AP)
September 04, 2020 - 8:03 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian scientists have belatedly published first results from early trials into the experimental Sputnik V vaccine, which received government approval last month but drew considerable criticism from experts, as the shots had only been tested on several dozen people before being more...
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In this photo made from footage provided by the Russian Defense Ministry on Wednesday, July 15, 2020, medical workers in protective gear prepare to draw blood from volunteers participating in a trial of a coronavirus vaccine at the Budenko Main Military Hospital outside Moscow, Russia. Russia is boasting that it’s about to be the first country to approve a COVID-19 vaccine, but scientists worldwide are sounding the alarm that the headlong rush could backfire. (Russian Defense Ministry Press Service via AP)
August 07, 2020 - 12:02 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Russia boasts that it’s about to become the first country to approve a COVID-19 vaccine, with mass vaccinations planned as early as October using shots that are yet to complete clinical trials -- and scientists worldwide are sounding the alarm that the headlong rush could backfire...
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This 2018 photo provided by Paolo David Escobar shows a male Hillstar hummingbird perched on a Chuquiraga jussieui flower in Ecuador. A study released on Friday, July 17, 2020 finds that the species of hummingbirds can sing and hear frequencies beyond the range of other birds. The unusually high-pitched songs may help the birds woo above background noises in their windy, mountain environment. (Paolo David Escobar/Neoselva Photography via AP)
July 17, 2020 - 11:06 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Perched on a flowering shrub on a windy Andean mountainside, the tiny Ecuadorian Hillstar hummingbird chirps songs of seduction that only another bird of its kind can hear. As the male sings, he inflates his throat, causing iridescent throat feathers to glisten princely purple...
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A man wears protective face masks stands in front of TV screens broadcasting Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam delivering a speech in Hong Kong, Monday, Feb. 3, 2020. Lam says the city will shut almost all land and sea border control points to the mainland from midnight to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus from China. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
February 03, 2020 - 4:02 am
BEIJING (AP) — The Latest on the outbreak of a new virus from China (all times local): 7 p.m. Chinese scientists say they have more evidence that the new virus that recently emerged in China likely originated in bats. In two papers published Monday in the journal Nature, scientists report that...
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This image provided by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows a collection of lung scans of 20 monkeys who were exposed to tuberculosis after receiving different forms of a TB vaccine. Monkeys in the top row received skin-deep shots, and those in the bottom row were given intravenous injections. The intravenous vaccine protected far better, as shown by TB-caused inflammation seen in red and yellow. (JoAnne Flynn, Alexander White and Pauline Maiello/Pitt; Mario Roederer/NIAID via AP)
January 01, 2020 - 10:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists think they’ve figured out how to make a century-old tuberculosis vaccine far more protective: Simply give the shot a different way. In a study with monkeys, injecting the vaccine straight into the bloodstream dramatically improved its effectiveness over today's skin-...
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