Science

In this Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020 photo released by Kensington Palace, Britain's Prince William, centre, and Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, react with Naturalist David Attenborough, left, with their children, Prince George, seated, Princess Charlotte, right and Prince Louis, foreground, in the gardens of Kensington Palace in London after Prince William joined Attenborough to watch a private outdoor screening of his upcoming film - David Attenborough: A Life On Our Planet. (Kensington Palace via AP)
September 27, 2020 - 3:08 am
LONDON (AP) — Veteran broadcaster and naturalist David Attenborough has given Britain’s Prince George a giant shark tooth fossil after a private viewing of his new documentary at Kensington Palace. Photos released by the palace showed the 7-year-old prince looking intrigued as he looked at the...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2020 file photo, senior Clinical Research Nurse Ajithkumar Sukumaran prepares the COVID 19 vaccine to administer to a volunteer, at a clinic in London. The British government on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020 says it may take part in a study that tries to deliberately infect volunteers who have been given an experimental vaccine against the coronavirus in an effort to more quickly determine if the vaccine works. The approach, called a challenge study, is risky but proponents think it may produce results faster than typical studies, which wait to see if volunteers who have been given an experimental treatment or a dummy version get sick. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)
September 24, 2020 - 1:37 pm
LONDON (AP) — The British government says it may take part in a study that tries to deliberately infect volunteers who have been given an experimental vaccine against the coronavirus in an effort to more quickly determine if the vaccine works. The approach, called a challenge study, is risky but...
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September 24, 2020 - 4:34 am
MADRID (AP) — At least 30 of 41 members of a gospel choir in northeastern Spain have contracted coronavirus following a rehearsal indoors with little air circulation, local authorities and the chorus say. The River Troupe Gospel, a volunteer gospel group, rehearsed on Sept. 11 ahead of an open-air...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, May 13, 2014 file photo, AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot leaves the British Parliament's Business Innovation and Skills Committee after a hearing in central London. Two firms developing COVID-19 vaccines say pharmaceutical companies are trying to give the public as much information as possible about their testing regimes as drugmakers and public health officials seek to boost confidence that any approved vaccine will be safe. AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot and Paul Stoffels, chief scientific officer of Johnson & Johnson, said Thursday Sept. 24, 2020, that they recognize the coronavirus emergency demands increased transparency from vaccine developers to ensure the public has faith in the end product. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File)
September 24, 2020 - 4:32 am
LONDON (AP) — Two firms developing COVID-19 vaccines say pharmaceutical companies are trying to give the public as much information as possible about their testing regimes as drugmakers and public health officials seek to boost confidence that any approved vaccine will be safe. AstraZeneca CEO...
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Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health, testifies during a Senate Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee Hearing on the federal government response to COVID-19 on Capitol Hill Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Washington. (Graeme Jennings/Pool via AP)
Associated Press
September 23, 2020 - 1:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A huge international study of a COVID-19 vaccine that aims to work with just one dose is getting underway as top U.S. health officials sought Wednesday to assure a skeptical Congress and public that they can trust any shots the government ultimately approves. Hopes are high that...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020, file photo, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Robert Redfield puts his mask back on after speaking at a Senate Appropriations subcommittee hearing on a "Review of Coronavirus Response Efforts," on Capitol Hill, in Washington. The CDC has stirred confusion, by posting, and then taking down, an apparent change in its position on how easily the coronavirus can spread through the air. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool, File)
Associated Press
September 21, 2020 - 4:04 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The top U.S. public health agency stirred confusion by posting — and then taking down — an apparent change in its position on how easily the coronavirus can spread from person to person on small droplets in the air. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said that the...
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A man walks near a hole at the Sanam Luang field in Bangkok, Thailand, Monday, Sept. 21, 2020. A plaque symbolizing Thailand's transition to democracy has been removed less than 24 hours after it was installed by anti-government demonstrators in a historic royal field. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
September 21, 2020 - 4:15 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A plaque honoring struggles for democracy in Thailand was removed from a royal field less than 24 hours after being installed by anti-government protesters and was submitted as evidence in connection with a complaint by officials that its installation was illegal, police said Monday...
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A child takes a pencil during a class conducted by Veena Gupta on a sidewalk in New Delhi, India, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2020. Veena Gupta and her husband are conducting free classes for underprivileged children on a sidewalk in New Delhi. As most schools in India remain shut since late March when the country imposed a nationwide lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19, many switched to digital learning and taking classes online. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
September 21, 2020 - 2:05 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — On a quiet road in India's capital, tucked away on a wide, red-bricked sidewalk, kids set adrift by the country's COVID-19 lockdown are being tutored. The children, ages 4 to 14, carry book bags more than 2 kilometers (a mile) from their thatched-roof huts on the banks of the...
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A "promotora" (health promoter) from CASA, a Hispanic advocacy group, tries to enroll Latinos as volunteers to test a potential COVID-19 vaccine, at a farmers market in Takoma Park, Md., on Sept. 9, 2020. Minority enrollment in studies of two shots has inched up in recent weeks, but even more is needed this fall as additional vaccine testing gets underway over the next two months. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio)
September 18, 2020 - 10:21 am
TAKOMA PARK, Md. (AP) — In front of baskets of tomatoes and peppers, near a sizzling burrito grill, the “promotoras” stop masked shoppers at a busy Latino farmers market: Want to test a COVID-19 vaccine? Aided by Spanish-speaking “health promoters” and Black pastors, a stepped-up effort is underway...
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FILE - In this July 6, 2020 file photo, a health care worker administers a COVID-19 test at a site sponsored by Community Heath of South Florida at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Clinica Campesina Health Center in Homestead, Fla. A drug company says on Friday, Sept. 18, that a medicine it sells to tamp down inflammation has helped prevent the need for breathing machines in hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the first large study that primarily enrolled minorities. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)
Associated Press
September 18, 2020 - 7:30 am
A drug company said Friday that a medicine it sells to tamp down inflammation has helped prevent the need for breathing machines in hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the first large study that primarily enrolled Hispanics and Blacks. Switzerland-based Roche reported the results for tocilizumab,...
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