Right to privacy

A soldier of the Swiss army wearing a protective face mask holds a smartphone with an app using Decentralized Privacy-Preserving Proximity Tracing (DP-3T) during a test with 100 soldiers in the military compound of Chamblon near Yverdon-les-Bains, Switzerland, Thursday, April 30, 2020. The race by governments to develop mobile tracing apps in order to contain infections after lockdowns ease is focusing attention on privacy. The debate is especially urgent in Europe, where academics and civil liberties activists are pushing for solutions that protect personal data. (Laurent Gillieron/Keystone via AP)
May 04, 2020 - 3:56 am
LONDON (AP) — Goodbye lockdown, hello smartphone. As governments race to develop mobile tracing apps to help contain infections, attention is turning to how officials will ensure users’ privacy. The debate is especially urgent in Europe, which has been one of the hardest-hit regions in the world,...
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A woman covers her face as she shops at a food market in Tel Aviv, Israel, Sunday, March 15, 2020. ‏Israel has imposed a number of tough restrictions to slow the spread of the new coronavirus. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced that schools, universities, restaurants and places of entertainment will be closed to stop the spread of the coronavirus. He also encouraged people not to go to their workplaces unless absolutely necessary. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
March 15, 2020 - 3:44 pm
JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel has long been known for its use of technology to track the movements of Palestinian militants. Now, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu wants to use similar technology to stop the movement of the coronavirus. Netanyahu’s Cabinet on Sunday authorized the Shin Bet security...
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President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally Monday, Feb. 10, 2020, in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
February 10, 2020 - 9:36 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — After the Parkland school shooting in Florida two years ago, President Donald Trump chided Republican lawmakers for being too “scared” of the National Rifle Association to tighten gun laws — then backed away from the idea. After back-to-back mass shootings in Ohio and Texas in...
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FILE - In this file photo dated Wednesday, March 28, 2012, a security cctv camera is seen by the Olympic Stadium at the Olympic Park in London. The South Wales police deployed facial recognition surveillance equipment on Sunday Jan. 12, 2020, in a test to monitor crowds arriving for a weekend soccer match in real-time, that is prompting public debate about possible aggressive uses of facial recognition in Western democracies, raising questions about human rights and how the technology may enter people's daily lives in the future. (AP Photo/Sang Tan, FILE)
Associated Press
January 24, 2020 - 9:08 am
LONDON (AP) — London police will start using facial recognition cameras to pick out suspects from street crowds in real time, in a major advance for the controversial technology that raises worries about automated surveillance and erosion of privacy rights. The Metropolitan Police Service said...
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FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2019, file photo California Attorney General Xavier Becerra gestures while speaking at a media conference in San Francisco. Forty million Californians will shortly obtain sweeping digital privacy rights stronger than any seen before in the U.S., posing a significant challenge to Big Tech and the data economy it helped create. “If we do this right in California," says Becerra, the state will "put the capital P back into privacy for all Americans.” (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
December 29, 2019 - 7:28 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Forty million Californians will soon have sweeping digital-privacy rights stronger than any seen before in the U.S., posing a significant challenge to Big Tech and the data economy it helped create. So long as state residents don't mind shouldering much of the burden of...
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FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2019, file photo commuters pass through the World Trade Center in New York. A study by a U.S. agency has found that facial recognition technology often performs unevenly based on a person's race, gender or age. This is the first time the National Institute of Standards and Technology has investigated demographic differences in how face-scanning algorithms are able to identify people. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
December 19, 2019 - 2:04 pm
A study by a U.S. agency has found that facial recognition technology often performs unevenly based on a person's race, gender or age. But the nuanced report published Thursday is unlikely to allay the concerns of critics who worry about bias in face-scanning applications that are increasingly...
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Associated Press
December 05, 2019 - 3:08 pm
DALLAS (AP) — The Homeland Security Department is backing away from requiring U.S. citizens to submit to facial-recognition technology when they leave or enter the country. The department said Thursday that it has no plans to expand facial recognition to U.S. citizens. A spokesman said DHS will...
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FILE - This file photo combo of images shows a Google sign and the Facebook app. In a scathing indictment of the two most powerful corporate giants of the internet, Amnesty International insists in a new report published Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019, that Google and Facebook be compelled to change what it calls their surveillance-based business models. (AP Photo/File)
November 20, 2019 - 5:37 pm
Amnesty International issued a scathing indictment of the world’s dominant internet corporations, arguing in a new report that Google and Facebook should be forced to abandon what it calls their surveillance-based business model because it is “predicated on human rights abuse.” The London-based...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2018, file photo Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg takes his seat to testify before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Washington Post reported on Tuesday, July 23, 2019, that the Federal Trade Commission will allege that Facebook misled users about its privacy practices as part of an expected settlement.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
July 24, 2019 - 1:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on U.S. fine against Facebook over privacy (all times local): 4:05 p.m. Wednesday's government complaint against Facebook describes numerous cases of sneaky behavior. When the 2012 Federal Trade Commission consent order took effect, Facebook placed a disclaimer at the...
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FILE - In this April 30, 2019, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg makes the keynote speech at F8, Facebook's developer conference in San Jose, Calif. A Wall Street Journal report says that the FTC has voted this week to approve a fine of about $5 billion for Facebook over privacy violations. The report Friday, July 12, 2019, cites an unnamed person familiar with the matter. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar, File)
July 12, 2019 - 10:43 pm
At $5 billion, the fine the FTC is about to levy on Facebook is by far the largest it's given to a technology company, easily eclipsing the second largest, $22 million for Google in 2012. The long-expected punishment, which Facebook is well prepared for, is unlikely to make a dent in the social...
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