Online media

FILE - This June 22, 2019 file photo shows the exterior of the New York Times building in New York. The New York Times says it was wrong to trust the story of a Canadian man whose claims of witnessing and participating in atrocities as a member of the Islamic State was a central part of its award-winning 2018 podcast “Caliphate.” The 12-part series won a Peabody Award and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist. But it began to unravel when Canadian authorities in September arrested Shehroze Chaudhry on charges of perpetrating a terrorist hoax. He was included in the podcast under the alias Abu Huzayfah. The Times said its journalists should have done a better job vetting him, and not included his story as part of the podcast. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
December 22, 2020 - 3:55 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A high-profile podcast on terrorism from The New York Times that had been a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize was withdrawn as a contest entry in the wake of the newspaper saying the claims of a man central to “Caliphate" could not be verified. In a statement on Tuesday, the board of...
Read More
Retired Army Gen. Lloyd Austin, the Biden administrations choice to be secretary of defense, speaks at The Queen theater in Wilmington, Del., Wednesday, Dec. 9, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
December 21, 2020 - 10:45 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden's pick for defense secretary made his first foray into the world of Twitter on Monday, an uncharacteristic move for a retired general who studiously avoided the public spotlight for much of his four decades in the Army. Retired Gen. Lloyd Austin's social...
Read More
December 21, 2020 - 1:51 am
BEIJING (AP) — McDonald’s is selling a sandwich made of Spam topped with crushed Oreo cookies Monday in China in an attention-grabbing move that has raised eyebrows. Global brands from restaurants to automakers sometimes roll out offbeat products to appeal to Chinese tastes in the populous and...
Read More
FILE - In this Monday, Oct. 12, 2020 file photo, Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, uses his smartphone during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Researchers from NATO StratCom, a NATO-accredited research group based in Riga, Latvia, paid three Russian companies 300 euros ($368) to buy 337,768 fake likes, views and shares of posts on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube and TikTok, including content from verified accounts of Senators Grassley and Chris Murphy. Both senators consented to participate. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP, Pool)
December 20, 2020 - 9:01 pm
BRUSSELS (AP) — The conversation taking place on the verified social media accounts of two U.S. senators remained vulnerable to manipulation, even amid heightened scrutiny in the run up to the U.S. presidential election, an investigation by the NATO Strategic Communications Centre of Excellence...
Read More
FILE - In this Sunday, Jan. 26, 2020, file photo, Ariana Grande performs a medley at the 62nd annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. On Sunday, Dec. 20, 2020, Grande announced she is engaged in a series of social media photos of her and her fiance, Dalton Gomez, and a massive engagement ring. (Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP, File)
December 20, 2020 - 3:26 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Ariana Grande has announced she is engaged in a series of photos of her and her fiance and her engagement ring. The “Rain on Me” singer posted the photos of her cuddling with Dalton Gomez, a luxury real estate agent, on Instagram on Sunday. Grande included a close-up shot of the...
Read More
Benny Yun, owner of Yang Chow restaurant, left, delivers a take-out order in Los Angeles, Thursday, Dec. 17, 2020. Bigotry toward Asian Americans and Asian food has spread steadily alongside the coronavirus in the United States. Yun said even though his businesses have survived the pandemic, they get prank calls almost daily asking if they have dog or cat on the menu or impersonating a thick Asian accent. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
December 20, 2020 - 9:19 am
As the coronavirus spread throughout the U.S., bigotry toward Asian Americans was not far behind, fueled by the news that COVID-19 first appeared in China. Some initial evidence suggested the virus began in bats, which infected another animal that may have spread it to people at one of Wuhan, China...
Read More
December 19, 2020 - 12:32 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Boston police and prosecutors are investigating after body camera footage surfaced that shows officers pushing protesters, pepper-spraying crowds and one officer talking about hitting protesters with a police vehicle. A sergeant has been placed on administrative leave after the leak...
Read More
FILE - This June 22, 2019 file photo shows the exterior of the New York Times building in New York. The New York Times says it was wrong to trust the story of a Canadian man whose claims of witnessing and participating in atrocities as a member of the Islamic State was a central part of its award-winning 2018 podcast “Caliphate.” The 12-part series won a Peabody Award and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist. But it began to unravel when Canadian authorities in September arrested Shehroze Chaudhry on charges of perpetrating a terrorist hoax. He was included in the podcast under the alias Abu Huzayfah. The Times said its journalists should have done a better job vetting him, and not included his story as part of the podcast. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
December 18, 2020 - 3:39 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The New York Times admitted Friday that it could not verify the claims of a Canadian man whose account of committing atrocities for the Islamic State in Syria was a central part of its 2018 podcast “Caliphate.” The series had won a Peabody Award, the first ever for a podcast...
Read More
CORRECTS TO A GROUP OF 35 STATES AS WELL AS THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA AND TERRITORIES OF GUAM AND PUERTO RICO FILED, INSTEAD OF 38 STATES FILE - This Oct. 20, 2015, file photo, shows signage outside Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. A group of 35 states as well as the District of Columbia and the territories of Guam and Puerto Rico filed an anti-trust lawsuit against Google on Thursday, Dec. 17, 2020, alleging that the search giant has an illegal monopoly over the online search market that hurts consumers and advertisers. The lawsuit, announced by Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser, was filed in federal court in Washington, D.C. by states represented by bipartisan attorneys general. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
Associated Press
December 17, 2020 - 5:01 pm
DENVER (AP) — Dozens of more states are joining an escalating effort to prove Google has been methodically abusing its power as the internet's main gateway in a way that hurts consumers habitually feeding personal information into its search engine and advertisers pouring billions of dollars into...
Read More
December 17, 2020 - 2:15 pm
SOMERVILLE, Mass. (AP) — A wild turkey that had developed an online fan following but also drew complaints about aggressive behavior was euthanized last week, Massachusetts wildlife officials said. The turkey had become a fixture in a Somerville neighborhood, know by some adorers as “Pat Cluck” or...
Read More

Pages