Newspapers

FILE - Journalist Neil Sheehan is shown in New York, Nov. 29, 1988. Sheehan, a reporter and Pulitzer Prize-winning author who broke the story of the Pentagon Papers for The New York Times and who chronicled the deception at the heart of the Vietnam War in his epic book about the war, has died. He was 84. (AP Photo/Ed Bailey)
January 08, 2021 - 12:10 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Neil Sheehan, a reporter and Pulitzer Prize-winning author who broke the story of the Pentagon Papers for The New York Times and who chronicled the deception at the heart of the Vietnam War in his epic book about the conflict, died Thursday. He was 84. Sheehan died of...
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Exterior of the offices of the Las Vegas Review Journal
Ethan MIller/Getty Images
Associated Press
January 06, 2021 - 4:59 am
In a rare agreement where rivals are also partners, the two daily newspapers in Las Vegas are trading new broadsides in their years-long legal fight over one of the last remaining joint-operating agreements in the U.S.
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January 05, 2021 - 4:52 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — The rival daily newspapers in Nevada’s largest city are trading new broadsides in their years-long legal fight over one of the last remaining joint-operating agreements in the U.S. Attorneys for the Las Vegas Review-Journal and Las Vegas Sun went before a federal magistrate judge...
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FILE - In this Monday, April 25, 2016, file photo, Chicago Tribune and other newspapers are displayed at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport. Hedge fund Alden, Tribune’s largest shareholder, has offered to buy the rest of the newspaper publisher, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2020, at a price that values it at $520.6 million. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato, File)
December 31, 2020 - 7:46 am
Hedge fund Alden, Tribune's largest shareholder, has offered to buy the rest of the newspaper publisher at a price that values it at $520.6 million. Alden sent a letter to Tribune on Dec. 14, according to a regulatory filing posted Thursday, offering $14.25 per share for the stock of Tribune it...
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FILE- In this March 29, 2002 file photo, Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh, the alleged mastermind behind Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl's kidnap-slaying, appears at the court in Karachi, Pakistan. On Thursday, Dec. 24, 2020, a provincial court in Pakistan overturned a Supreme Court Decision that Sheikh should remain in custody during an appeal of his acquittal on charges he murdered Pearl. (AP Photo/Zia Mazhar, File)
December 24, 2020 - 6:40 pm
KARACHI, Pakistan (AP) — A provincial court in Pakistan ordered the release of a British-born Pakistani man charged in the 2002 murder of American journalist Daniel Pearl. The Sindh High Court’s release order Thursday overturns government detention orders that Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh, the key...
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December 23, 2020 - 3:55 am
BERLIN (AP) — A regional newspaper group in Germany has become the target of a cyberattack, preventing it from publishing its regular editions Wednesday. The Funke media group said the attack, which began Tuesday, affected numerous computer systems at editorial offices and printing plants across...
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FILE - This June 22, 2019 file photo shows the exterior of the New York Times building in New York. The New York Times says it was wrong to trust the story of a Canadian man whose claims of witnessing and participating in atrocities as a member of the Islamic State was a central part of its award-winning 2018 podcast “Caliphate.” The 12-part series won a Peabody Award and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist. But it began to unravel when Canadian authorities in September arrested Shehroze Chaudhry on charges of perpetrating a terrorist hoax. He was included in the podcast under the alias Abu Huzayfah. The Times said its journalists should have done a better job vetting him, and not included his story as part of the podcast. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
December 22, 2020 - 3:55 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A high-profile podcast on terrorism from The New York Times that had been a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize was withdrawn as a contest entry in the wake of the newspaper saying the claims of a man central to “Caliphate" could not be verified. In a statement on Tuesday, the board of...
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This undated file photo shows men in the newsroom of the The Kansas City Star on 18th Street and Grand Avenue in Kansas City, Mo. On Sunday, Dec. 20, 2020, the newspaper's top editor apologized for past decades of racially biased coverage and has posted a series of stories examining how it ignored the concerns and achievements of Black residents and helped keep Kansas City segregated. (The Kansas City Star via AP)
December 21, 2020 - 3:45 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The first significant attention that the Kansas City Star gave to hometown hero and jazz legend Charlie “Bird” Parker came when he died in 1955 — and the newspaper spelled his name wrong. That detail came to light when the Star investigated, and apologized for, its mistreatment of...
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Boxes containing the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine are moved to the loading dock for shipping at the McKesson distribution center in Olive Branch, Miss., Sunday, Dec. 20, 2020. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, Pool)
Associated Press
December 20, 2020 - 3:16 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A federal advisory panel recommended Sunday that people 75 and older and essential workers like firefighters, teachers and grocery store workers should be next in line for COVID-19 shots, while a second vaccine began rolling out to hospitals as the nation works to get the...
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FILE - This June 22, 2019 file photo shows the exterior of the New York Times building in New York. The New York Times says it was wrong to trust the story of a Canadian man whose claims of witnessing and participating in atrocities as a member of the Islamic State was a central part of its award-winning 2018 podcast “Caliphate.” The 12-part series won a Peabody Award and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist. But it began to unravel when Canadian authorities in September arrested Shehroze Chaudhry on charges of perpetrating a terrorist hoax. He was included in the podcast under the alias Abu Huzayfah. The Times said its journalists should have done a better job vetting him, and not included his story as part of the podcast. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
December 18, 2020 - 3:39 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The New York Times admitted Friday that it could not verify the claims of a Canadian man whose account of committing atrocities for the Islamic State in Syria was a central part of its 2018 podcast “Caliphate.” The series had won a Peabody Award, the first ever for a podcast...
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