Malaria

October 30, 2019 - 4:24 am
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization says more than 7 million cases of malaria have been reported in Burundi this year. Officials blame the outbreak on factors including the lack of protective bed nets, problems with medicines and climate change. The U.N. health agency says malaria has...
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France's President Emmanuel Macron gestures as he delivers a speech at the Lyon's congress hall, central France, Thursday, Oct. 10, 2019, during the meeting of international lawmakers, health leaders and people affected by HIV, Tuberculosis and malaria. Lyon is hosting the two day Global Fund event aimed at raising money to help in the global fight against the epidemics. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
October 10, 2019 - 2:28 am
PARIS (AP) — Heads of states, CEOs and global health leaders gathered Thursday in France to try to raise at least $14 billion to finance the fight against AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria over the next three years. French President Emmanuel Macron, who was hosting the conference in the city of Lyon,...
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A health worker vaccinates a child against malaria in Homabay County, western Kenya, Friday Sept.13, 2019. The vaccine is the world's first for malaria and has been rolled out in Kenya, Ghana, and Malawi by the World Health Organisation. (AP Photo/Joseph Oduor)
September 13, 2019 - 11:39 am
KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Health authorities in Kenya on Friday started administering doses of the world's only licensed malaria vaccine to young children in rural areas facing high transmission rates. Kenya became the third African country to introduce the vaccine, after Malawi and Ghana. The aim is...
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September 13, 2019 - 3:02 am
KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Health authorities in Kenya on Friday started administering doses of the world's only licensed malaria vaccine to young children in rural areas facing high transmission rates. Kenya became the third African country to introduce the vaccine, after Malawi and Ghana. The aim is...
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FILE - In this Oct. 30, 2009 file photo, a mother holds her baby receiving a new malaria vaccine as part of a trial at the Walter Reed Project Research Center in Kombewa in Western Kenya. The World Health Organization said Thursday Aug. 22, 2019, it’s theoretically possible to wipe out malaria, but probably not with the flawed vaccine and other control methods being used at the moment. (AP Photo/Karel Prinsloo, File)
August 23, 2019 - 1:51 am
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization says it's theoretically possible to wipe out malaria, but probably not with the imperfect vaccine and other control methods being used at the moment. Dr. Pedro Alonso, the U.N. health agency's global malaria director, said WHO is "unequivocally in favor"...
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FILE - In this Oct. 30, 2009 file photo, a mother holds her baby receiving a new malaria vaccine as part of a trial at the Walter Reed Project Research Center in Kombewa in Western Kenya. The World Health Organization said Tuesday April 23, 2019, that Malawi has become the first country to introduce a pilot program vaccinating children against malaria using the only licensed vaccine to protect against the mosquito-spread disease. Although the vaccine only protects about one third of children who are immunized, those who get the shot are likely to have less severe cases of malaria. (AP Photo/Karel Prinsloo, File)
April 23, 2019 - 12:52 pm
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization says Malawi has become the first country to begin immunizing children against malaria, using the only licensed vaccine to protect against the mosquito-spread disease. Although the vaccine only protects about one-third of children who are immunized, those...
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November 19, 2018 - 5:56 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — The World Health Organization says progress in reducing the number of people contracting malaria has stalled after several years of global declines. The WHO said Monday that there were about 219 million cases of malaria in 2017, up 2 million from the previous year. In contrast,...
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FILE - This April 28, 2010, file photo shows the GlaxoSmithKline offices in London. On Friday, July 20, 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved GlaxoSmithKline’s Krintafel, a simpler, one-dose treatment, to prevent relapses of malaria. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)
July 20, 2018 - 3:07 pm
U.S. regulators Friday approved a simpler, one-dose treatment to prevent relapses of malaria. Standard treatment now takes two weeks and studies show many patients don't finish taking every dose. Malaria is caused by parasites that are spread to people through mosquito bites. Antimalarial drugs can...
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