Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race

FILE - In this March 18, 2020, file photo, Thomas Waerner, of Norway, arrives in Nome, Alaska, to win the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. The 2021 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race will be about 140 miles shorter than normal as a result of complications stemming from the coronavirus pandemic, race officials announced Friday, Dec. 18, 2020. The teams will no longer embark on a 1,000-mile (1,609-kilometer) journey to Nome but instead will take a roughly 860-mile (1,384-kilometer) loop that starts and ends in Willow. (Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News via AP)
December 19, 2020 - 3:47 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The 2021 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race will be about 140 miles (225 kilometers) shorter than normal as a result of complications stemming from the coronavirus pandemic. Race officials announced Friday that teams will no longer embark on a 1,000-mile (1,609-kilometer) journey...
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A nurse walks COVID-19 tests back to the tent at the free COVID-19 testing site on Monday, Nov. 23, 2020 in Glenwood Springs, Colo. (Chelsea Self/Glenwood Springs Post Independent via AP)
November 23, 2020 - 7:55 pm
BEIJING — China has reported new coronavirus cases in the cities of Shanghai and Tianjin as it seeks to prevent small outbreaks from becoming larger ones. The National Health Commission said Tuesday that there were two new locally spread cases in the previous 24-hour period, one in each city. It...
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FILE - In this on March 11, 2012 file photo, Dallas Seavey pulls in to the checkpoint in Unalakleet, Alaska, during the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. The world's most famous sled dog race will go forward in 2021, and officials are preparing for every potential contingency now for what the coronavirus and the world might look like in March when the Iditarod starts. It's not the mushers that worry Iditarod CEO Rob Urbach; they're used to social distancing along the 1,000 mile trail. The headaches start with what to do with hundreds of volunteers needed to run the race, some scattered in villages along the trail between Anchorage and Nome, to protect them and the village populations. (Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News via AP, File)
September 24, 2020 - 5:36 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The world’s most famous sled dog race will go forward in 2021, and amid the ongoing pandemic, officials now are preparing for every possible contingency for what the race and the world might look like in March when the Iditarod starts. It’s not the mushers who worry...
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FILE - In this March 18, 2020, file photo, Thomas Waerner, of Norway, celebrates in Nome, Alaska, his win in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Waerner is still waiting to return to his home in Norway. Waerner and his 16 dogs have been stranded in Alaska by travel restrictions and flight cancellations caused by the coronavirus pandemic. (Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News via AP, File)
May 24, 2020 - 7:52 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Thomas Waerner won this year’s Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in March, but he is still waiting to return to his home in Norway. Waerner and his 16 dogs have been stranded in Alaska by travel restrictions and flight cancellations caused by the coronavirus pandemic, The...
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FILE - In this March 20, 2019, file photo, Iditarod musher Nicolas Petit, of France, poses with two of his dogs in Anchorage, Alaska. Nearly a third of the 57 mushers in this year’s Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race have quit the race before finishing, including Petit, who activated an alert button seeking rescue Thursday morning, March 19, 2020, because of weather conditions. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)
March 19, 2020 - 9:43 am
ANCHORAGE, Alasak (AP) — Nearly a third of the 57 mushers in this year’s Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race have quit the race before finishing, including a musher who activated an alert button seeking rescue Thursday morning because of weather conditions. Thomas Waerner of Norway won this year’s race,...
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March 18, 2020 - 1:40 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Norwegian musher Thomas Waerner wins Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race across Alaska.
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Linwood Fiedler mushes across Submarine Lake near Nikolai, Alaska, Tuesday, March 10, 2020, during the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. (Loren Holmes
March 14, 2020 - 10:16 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — As Iditarod mushers drove their dog teams across Alaska on Saturday, race officials scrambled to make last minute changes prompted by concerns over the new coronavirus, including asking fans not to fly to Nome for the finish. Officials late Friday night urged race fans,...
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FILE - In this March 10, 2007 file photo Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race front runner, four-time Iditarod champion Jeff King of Denali Park, Alaska, drives his dog team through the wind on the Yukon River near the Eagle Island, Alaska. When 57 mushers line up Sunday, March 8, 2020 for the official start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, it will be the second-smallest field in the past two decades. (AP Photo/Al Grillo,File)
March 07, 2020 - 11:43 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — When 57 mushers line up Sunday for the official start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, it will be the second-smallest field in the past two decades. Only last year’s field of 52 was smaller. Interest in the world’s most famous sled dog race has waned in recent years, in...
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Stan Moll throws bales of hay onto a makeshift table in Anchorage, Alaska, on Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020, so other Iditarod volunteers could place the bales into plastic bags. About 1,500 bales will be flown to checkpoints along the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, which begins March 7, and will be put down on the snow and ice so the canine participants in the race have a warm place to sleep. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)
February 14, 2020 - 1:38 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Volunteers slung bales of hay onto a table Thursday, where they were swiftly stuffed inside blue plastic bags, twirled and shut with twist ties before being dragged off to waiting pallets. The 60 or so people in safety vests weren’t participating in some type of...
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FILE - In this March 2, 2019, file photo, defending champion Joar Lefseth Ulsom runs his team down Fourth Ave during the ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Anchorage, Alaska. Alaska's famed Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race has joined a new global circuit of long-distance sled dog racing. Officials of the 1,000-mile race have teamed up with Norway pet food supplement company and series creator, Aker BioMarine, and other races in Minnesota, Norway and Russia for the inaugural QRILL Pet Arctic World Series, or QPAWS, next year. (AP Photo/Michael Dinneen, File)
October 24, 2019 - 2:59 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska's famed Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race has joined a new global partnership billed as the World Series of long-distance sled dog racing and aimed at bringing more fans to the cold-weather sport. The Iditarod has teamed up with Norway pet food supplement company and...
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