Environmental science

Poland's Environment Minister Henryk Kowalczyk talks of the efforts that Poland is taking to limit its greenhouse gas emissions during a session of U.N. climate summit in Katowice, Poland, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
December 11, 2018 - 2:59 pm
KATOWICE, Poland (AP) — The world needs to "do more and faster" to prevent global warming on a scale that would cause irreversible environmental damage and hit poor societies hard, the head of the U.N.'s top science panel on climate change said Tuesday. Hoesung Lee, who chairs the Intergovernmental...
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Poland's Environment Minister Henryk Kowalczyk talks of the efforts that Poland is taking to limit its greenhouse gas emissions during a session of U.N. climate summit in Katowice, Poland, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
December 11, 2018 - 12:40 pm
KATOWICE, Poland (AP) — The Latest on U.N. climate talks in Poland (all times local): 9:10 p.m. Germany's environment minister says it's crucial to offer mining industry workers other options for a transition from coal to energy sources that don't contribute to global warming to succeed. Svenja...
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In this undated photo provided by researchers in December 2018, a male tungara frog in Panama uses his vocal sac to call out in Gamboa, Panama. A study released on Monday, Dec. 10, 2018, examines why these amphibians adapt their mating calls in urban areas _ an unexpected example of how animals change communication strategies when cities encroach on forests. (Adam Dunn via AP)
December 10, 2018 - 8:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — City frogs and rainforest frogs don't sing the same tune, researchers have found. A study released Monday examined why Panama's tiny tungara frogs adapt their mating calls in urban areas — an unexpected example of how animals change communication strategies when cities encroach on...
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Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler signs an order withdrawing an Obama era emissions standards policy, at the EPA Headquarters in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
December 06, 2018 - 4:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency acted again Thursday to ease rules on the sagging U.S. coal industry, this time scaling back what would have been a tough control on climate-changing emissions from any new coal plants. The latest Trump administration targeting of legacy Obama...
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FILE - In this Nov. 17, 2018 file photo, President Donald Trump talks with from left, Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom, as California Gov. Jerry Brown, walks at right during a visit to a neighborhood destroyed by the Camp wildfire in Paradise, Calif. For US governors, including those taking office early next year, fires, floods and other climate-related emergencies could become top policy concerns. During his campaign, Newsom said the state needs to be more aggressive in clearing trees and brush, particularly its millions of dead trees. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
November 24, 2018 - 7:17 am
Governors have a wide range of priorities they want to tackle in the coming year, from tax reform to education. Yet it's a topic that receives less attention on the campaign trail and in their speeches that could determine their success — natural disasters. In the last two years alone, storms and...
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FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2018 file photo, firefighter Jose Corona sprays water as flames from the Camp Fire consume a home in Magalia, Calif. A massive new federal report warns that extreme weather disasters, like California’s wildfires and 2018’s hurricanes, are worsening in the United States. The White House report quietly issued Friday, Nov. 23 also frequently contradicts President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
November 24, 2018 - 3:24 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — As California's catastrophic wildfires recede and people rebuild after two hurricanes, a massive new federal report warns that these types of disasters are worsening in the United States because of global warming. The White House report quietly issued Friday also frequently...
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Pavel Kabat, WMO Chief Scientist and Research Director, speaks about the release of WMO Greenhouse Gas Bulletin with details on annual average concentration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, during a press conference, at the European headquarters of the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, Nov. 22, 2018. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)
November 22, 2018 - 5:59 am
GENEVA (AP) — A top U.N. scientist on Thursday shrugged off an online quip from U.S. President Donald Trump that questioned global warming, saying a U.S. government report will show the "fundamental impacts of climate change on the U.S. continent." Officials at the World Meteorological Organization...
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In this undated photo provided by Eric Regehr, polar bears are seen on Wrangel Island in the Arctic Circle. A study of polar bears in the Chukchi Sea between Alaska and Russia finds that the population is thriving for now despite a loss of sea ice due to climate change. Lead author Eric Regehr of the University of Washington says the Chukchi may be buffered from some effects of ice loss. Regehr says polar bears can build fat reserves and the Chukchi's abundant seal population may allow bears to compensate for a loss of hunting time on ice. (AP Photo Eric Regehr via AP)
November 15, 2018 - 5:43 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The first formal count of polar bears in waters between the United States and Russia indicates they're doing better than some of their cousins elsewhere. Polar bears are listed as a threatened species because of diminished sea ice due to climate change. But university and...
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In this Oct. 8, 2018 photo, shows the entrance to the Chacaltaya atmospheric observatory, at Chacaltaya mountain, Bolivia. The station is an important place to collect data samples partly due to its own location on the remnants of a glacier. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
November 07, 2018 - 9:35 pm
LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) — The snow appears to be pristine on the Andean peaks that loom above Bolivia's capital, but even here ash and smog reach up to a remote plateau that is home to the world's highest atmospheric observatory. It's an ideal site for a team of international scientists who collect...
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FILE - In this April 30, 2014, file photo, Dustin Shaw lifts debris as he searches through what is left of his sister's house at Parkwood Meadows neighborhood after a tornado in Vilonia, Ark. A new study finds that tornado activity is generally shifting eastward to areas just east of the Mississippi River that are more vulnerable such as Mississippi, Arkansas and Tennessee. And it's going down in Oklahoma, Kansas and Texas. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)
October 17, 2018 - 3:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Over the past few decades tornadoes have been shifting — decreasing in Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas but spinning up more in states along the Mississippi River and farther east, a new study shows. Scientists aren't quite certain why. Tornado activity is increasing most in Mississippi...
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