Diagnosis and treatment

FILE - In this Jan. 21, 2020, file photo, state Sen. Scott Wiener, D-San Francisco, speaks at a news conference in Sacramento, Calif. Sen. Wiener has introduced legislation that would ban certain medically unnecessary surgeries on children born with ambiguous or conflicting genitalia. The first-of-its-kind legislation would not allow these types of surgeries until the child is at least 6-years-old. A similar bill failed to pass last year after facing opposition from the California Medical Association. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
January 15, 2021 - 2:58 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A California lawmaker is trying again to ban some medically unnecessary surgeries on intersex children until they are at least 6-years-old, hoping a narrower focus combined with new legislative leadership will be enough to get the first-of-its-kind legislation signed into...
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A woman wearing a face mask to protect against coronavirus walks at a train station in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Jan. 11, 2021. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)
January 11, 2021 - 8:57 pm
WELLINGTON, New Zealand — New Zealand will soon require that travelers from most countries show negative coronavirus tests before they leave for New Zealand. COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says New Zealand is in a fortunate position to have stamped out community spread of the virus, but...
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Dr. David Tom Cooke, head of general thoracic surgery at UC Davis Health, poses outside the UC Davis Medical center in Sacramento, Calif., Friday, Dec. 18, 2020. Cooke participated in Pfizer's clinical trial for the coronavirus as part of an effort to reduce skepticism about the vaccine among African Americans. He's now promoting the vaccine's safety and the importance of taking it on his social media pages. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
January 04, 2021 - 8:52 am
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Dr. David Tom Cooke says his choice to participate in a clinical trial for a coronavirus vaccine is like his grandmother’s decision to leave the Jim Crow South to work in California’s naval shipyards during World War II. She was determined to contribute even though the...
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Medical student Mara Karcher vaccinates a resident Ella Holdenried of Sankt Verena nursing home in Strassberg, Germany, Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2020. German authorities have reported more than 1,000 coronavirus-related deaths in one day for the first time since the pandemic began. The national disease control center, the Robert Koch Institute, said Wednesday that 1,129 more deaths were reported over the past 24 hours. (Felix Kaestle/dpa via AP)
December 31, 2020 - 11:15 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — The European Union medicines watchdog said Thursday that German company BioNTech has applied for clearance in the 27-nation bloc to administer up to six doses of its COVID-19 vaccine from each vial, instead of the five doses currently approved. In an email to The...
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December 25, 2020 - 2:47 pm
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A Black doctor who died battling COVID-19 complained of racist medical care in widely shared social media posts days before her death, prompting an Indiana hospital system to promise a “full external review" into her treatment. Dr. Susan Moore, 52, tested positive for COVID-19...
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In this image taken from a video released on Dec. 21, 2020 by Russian opposition activist Alexei Navalny on his Instagram account, Russian opposition activist Alexei Navalny tells how he spoke with as Konstantin Kudryavtsev, a trained chemical-weapons specialist. Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny on Monday released a recording of a phone call he said he made to an alleged state security operative who revealed details of how the politician was poisoned. (Navalny Instagram account via AP)
December 23, 2020 - 2:40 am
BERLIN (AP) — German doctors treating Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny after he was poisoned with a nerve agent have detailed the case in an article for a major medical journal. Berlin's Charite hospital said Wednesday that Navalny had given his permission for the article to be published in...
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FILE - In this Saturday, April 18, 2020 file photo, mortician Cordarial O. Holloway, foreground left, funeral director Robert L. Albritten, foreground right, and funeral attendants Eddie Keith, background left, and Ronald Costello place a casket into a hearse in Dawson, Ga. This is the deadliest year in U.S. history, with deaths topping 3 million for the first time. It's due mainly to the coronavirus pandemic that has killed nearly 320,000 Americans. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
December 22, 2020 - 5:56 am
NEW YORK (AP) — This is the deadliest year in U.S. history, with deaths expected to top 3 million for the first time — due mainly to the coronavirus pandemic. Final mortality data for this year will not be available for months. But preliminary numbers suggest that the United States is on track to...
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In this Friday, March 13, 2020 photo provided by Regneron, members of the Infectious Disease team celebrate at their lab in New York state after confirming cells from Singapore are viable and that some make antibodies that bind to the coronavirus, suggesting they may have the potential to block it. (Regeneron via AP)
December 20, 2020 - 9:05 pm
On a Saturday afternoon in March as COVID-19 was bearing down on New York City, a dozen scientists anxiously crowded around a computer in a suburban drug company’s lab. They had spent weeks frantically getting blood from early survivors across the globe and from mice with human-like immune systems...
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FILE - This Feb. 19, 2013, file photo shows OxyContin pills arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. A bipartisan congressional investigation released Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020, found that key players in the nation’s opioid industry have spent $65 million since 1997 funding nonprofits that advocate treating pain with medications, a strategy intended to boost the sale of prescription painkillers. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)
December 16, 2020 - 4:42 pm
A bipartisan congressional investigation released Wednesday found that key players in the nation’s opioid industry have spent $65 million since 1997 funding nonprofits that advocate treating pain with medications, a strategy intended to boost the sale of prescription painkillers. The report from...
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FILE - Kareem Abdul-Jabbar arrives at the ESPY Awards in Los Angeles, in this July 18, 2018, file photo. Abdul-Jabbar revealed he had prostate cancer in a magazine article he wrote about health risks faced by Blacks. Abdul-Jabbar, the NBA's career scoring leader, provided no other details about that illness in the piece he wrote for WebMD that first appeared Wednesday, Dec. 9, 2020. A publicist for Abdul-Jabbar said this is the first time he has spoken about the prostate cancer. (Photo by Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP, File)
December 10, 2020 - 7:05 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Kareem Abdul-Jabbar revealed he had prostate cancer in a magazine article he wrote about health risks faced by Blacks. Abdul-Jabbar, the NBA's career scoring leader, provided no other details about that illness in the piece he wrote for WebMD that first appeared Wednesday. A...
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