Data privacy

FILE - This Feb. 19, 2014, file photo shows the Facebook app icon on an iPhone in New York. Apple says it has banned a Facebook-made app that paid users, including teenagers, to extensively track their data. The app, Facebook Research, tracked people’s phone and web activity in exchange for payments. A report in the tech blog TechCrunch on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019, says Facebook paid about $20 a month in exchange for people letting it track their phone activities. While Facebook says this was done with permission, the company has a history of defining “permission” loosely and obscuring what sort of data it collects. (AP Photo/Karly Domb Sadof, File)
January 30, 2019 - 5:42 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Apple says Facebook can no longer distribute an app that paid users, including teenagers, to extensively track their phone and web use. In doing so, Apple closed off Facebook's efforts to sidestep Apple's app store and its tighter rules on privacy. The tech blog TechCrunch reported...
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FILE- In this May 1, 2018, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the keynote speech at F8, Facebook's developer conference, in San Jose, Calif. Facebook may be facing the biggest fine ever imposed by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission for privacy violations that breached a commitment to protect the personal information of its social network’s 2.2 billion users. The Washington Post reported, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, that the FTC is considering hitting Facebook with a penalty that would top its previous record fine of $22.5 million dealt to Google in 2012. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
January 18, 2019 - 1:01 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook may be facing the biggest fine ever imposed by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission for privacy violations involving the personal information of its 2.2 billion users. The FTC is considering hitting Facebook with a penalty that would top its previous record fine of $22.5...
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FILE - This Jan. 28, 2015, file photo, shows the Federal Trade Commission building in Washington. Consumer advocates and the data-hungry technology industry are drawing early battle lines in advance of an expected fight over a national privacy law. Privacy organizations on Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, suggested sidelining the Federal Trade Commission with a new data-protection agency empowered to police U.S. industry. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
January 16, 2019 - 9:19 pm
Privacy advocates are calling for a new federal agency to oversee consumer data privacy. The organizations' plan would sideline the Federal Trade Commission and strengthen digital privacy protections for U.S. citizens. In contrast, a D.C. think tank backed by technology companies is advocating for...
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January 10, 2019 - 2:05 am
LONDON (AP) — An adviser to Europe's top court says Google doesn't have to extend "right to be forgotten" rules to its search engines globally. The European Court of Justice's advocate general released a preliminary opinion Thursday in the case involving the U.S. tech company and France's data...
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December 19, 2018 - 10:13 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The District of Columbia sued Facebook on Wednesday for allowing data-mining firm Cambridge Analytica to improperly access data from as many as 87 million users. D.C. Attorney General Karl Racine's suit alleges that Facebook misled users about the security of their data and failed...
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FILE - In this March 15, 2013, file photo, a man walks past a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California, USA. Facebook gave some companies more extensive access to users’ personal data than it has previously revealed, letting them read private messages or see the names of friends without consent, according to a New York Times report published Wednesday Dec. 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
December 19, 2018 - 6:36 am
Facebook gave some companies more extensive access to users' personal data than it has previously revealed, letting them read private messages or see the names of friends without consent, according to a New York Times report. The newspaper on Wednesday detailed special arrangements between Facebook...
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FILE- In this March 29, 2018, file photo, the logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York's Times Square. In itself, Facebook’s latest privacy bug doesn’t sound like a big deal. But it’s part of a pattern for the social media giant that shows just how much data it has on its 2.27 billion users and how often these sorts of slipups happen. The company said Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 that software bug may have exposed a broader set of photos to app developers than users had granted permission for. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
December 14, 2018 - 1:24 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook's privacy controls have broken down yet again, this time through a software flaw affecting nearly 7 million users who had photos exposed to a much wider audience than intended. The bug disclosed Friday gave hundreds of apps unauthorized access to photos that could in theory...
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FILE- In this April 10, 2018, file photo Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg pauses while testifying before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. The British Parliament has released some 250 pages worth of documents that show Facebook considered charging developers for data access. The documents show internal discussions about linking data to revenue. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
December 05, 2018 - 5:58 pm
Internal Facebook documents released by a U.K. parliamentary committee offer the clearest evidence yet that the social network has used its enormous trove of user data as a competitive weapon, often in ways designed to keep its users in the dark. Parliament's media committee accused Facebook on...
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This photo posed for the photographer on Tuesday Nov. 27, 2018 and made available by the House of Commons shows the International Grand Committee with representation from 9 Parliaments and Mark Zuckerberg in non-attendance. Lawmakers from nine countries grilled Facebook executive, Richard Allan, on Tuesday as part of an international hearing at Britain's parliament on disinformation and "fake news." Facebook's vice president for policy solutions, answered questions in place of his boss, CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who ignored repeated requests to appear. (Gabriel Sainhas/House of Commons via AP)
November 27, 2018 - 10:13 am
LONDON (AP) — A cohort of international lawmakers is trying to turn up the pressure on Facebook, grilling one of its executives and making a show of founder Mark Zuckerberg's refusal to explain to them why his company failed to protect users' data privacy. The rare "international grand committee"...
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November 21, 2018 - 9:27 am
LONDON (AP) — Facebook has appealed its 500,000-pound ($644,000) fine for failing to protect the privacy of its users in the Cambridge Analytica scandal, arguing that U.K regulators failed to prove that British users were directly affected. Britain's Information Commissioner Office leveled the fine...
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