Court decisions

FILE - In this March 17, 2020 file photo, voters head to a polling station to vote in Florida's primary election in Orlando, Fla. Florida felons must pay all fines, restitution and legal fees before they can regain their right to vote, a federal appellate court ruled Friday, Sept, 11. Reversing a lower court judge's decision that gave Florida felons the right to vote regardless of outstanding legal obligations, the order from the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals was a disappointment to voting rights activists and could have national implications in November’s presidential election. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File)
September 11, 2020 - 2:20 pm
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Florida felons must pay all fines, restitution and legal fees before they can regain their right to vote, a federal appellate court ruled Friday in a case that could have broad implications for the November elections. Reversing a lower court judge's decision that gave...
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September 10, 2020 - 12:26 pm
MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The conservative-controlled Wisconsin Supreme Court on Thursday ordered a halt in the mailing of absentee ballots until it gives the go-ahead or makes any future ruling about who should be on the ballot in the critical battleground state. The order injects a measure of...
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A sign promoting Native American participation in the U.S. census is displayed as Selena Rides Horse enters information into her phone on behalf of a member of the Crow Indian Tribe in Lodge Grass, Mont. on Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020. There are more than 300 Native American reservations across the country, and almost all lag the rest of the country in participation in the census. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown)
September 10, 2020 - 8:06 am
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Even though a federal judge ordered the U.S. Census Bureau to halt winding down the 2020 census for the time being, supervisors in at least one California office have been instructed to make plans for laying off census takers, according to an email obtained by The Associated...
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FILE - In this Oct. 30, 2010, file photo, World Wrestling Entertainment chairman Vince McMahon raises his arm in the air to the audience during a fan appreciation event in Hartford, Conn. A federal appeals court on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020, dismissed a lawsuit filed by 50 former professional wrestlers, who claimed WWE failed to protect them from repeated head trauma including concussions that led to long-term brain damage. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
September 09, 2020 - 9:59 am
A federal appeals court dismissed a lawsuit Wednesday that had been filed by 50 former pro wrestlers, many of them stars in the 1980s and 1990s, who claimed World Wrestling Entertainment failed to protect them from repeated head injuries, including concussions that led to long-term brain damage...
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September 08, 2020 - 2:17 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — R. Kelly can remain behind bars awaiting multiple trials on child pornography and other charges in three states, an appeals court in New York said Tuesday as a lawyer for the R&B singer cited another inmate's attack on Kelly last month as one reason he should receive bail. The...
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FILE - This Sunday, April 5, 2020, photo shows an envelope containing a 2020 census letter mailed to a U.S. resident in Detroit. The U.S. Census Bureau has spent much of the past year defending itself against allegations that its duties have been overtaken by politics. With a failed attempt by the Trump administration to add a citizenship question, the hiring of three political appointees with limited experience to top positions, a sped-up schedule and a directive from President Donald Trump to exclude undocumented residents from the process of redrawing congressional districts, the 2020 census has descended into a high-stakes partisan battle. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
September 08, 2020 - 11:41 am
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Two days after a federal judge ordered the U.S. Census Bureau to stop winding down 2020 census operations for the time being, the statistical agency said Tuesday in court papers that it's refraining from laying off some census takers and it's restoring some quality-control...
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FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2019 file photo, a picture of slain Saudi journalist Jamal Kashoggi, is displayed during a ceremony near the Saudi Arabia consulate in Istanbul, marking the one-year anniversary of his death. Saudi Arabia’s state television says final verdicts have been issued in the case of slain Washington Post columnist and Saudi critic Jamal Khashoggi after his family announced pardons that spared five from execution. The Riyadh Criminal Court issued final verdicts Monday, Sept. 7, 2020, against eight people. The court ordered a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison for five, with one receiving a 10-year sentence and two others being ordered to serve seven years in prison. The trial was widely criticized by rights groups and an independent U.N. investigator, who noted that no senior officials nor anyone suspected of ordering the killing was found guilty. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File)
September 07, 2020 - 9:14 am
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A Saudi court issued final verdicts on Monday in the case of slain Washington Post columnist and Saudi critic Jamal Khashoggi after his son, who still resides in the kingdom, announced pardons that spared five of the convicted individuals from execution. While the...
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FILE - In this April 23, 2019 file photo, immigration activists rally outside the Supreme Court as the justices hear arguments over the Trump administration's plan to ask about citizenship on the 2020 census, in Washington. The U.S. Census Bureau has spent much of the past year defending itself against allegations that its duties have been overtaken by politics. With a failed attempt by the Trump administration to add a citizenship question, the hiring of three political appointees with limited experience to top positions, a sped-up schedule and a directive from President Donald Trump to exclude undocumented residents from the process of redrawing congressional districts, the 2020 census has descended into a high-stakes partisan battle. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
September 06, 2020 - 10:50 am
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The U.S. Census Bureau for now must stop following a plan that would have it winding down operations in order to finish the 2020 census at the end of September, according to a federal judge's order. U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh in San Jose, California, issued a temporary...
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FILE - In this March 28, 2012, file photo, Amit Mehta, then the attorney for Dominique Strauss-Kahn speaks in Bronx state Supreme Court in New York. Judge Amit Mehta has ordered the Trump administration to resume issuing diversity visas for immigrants from underrepresented countries. The order issued Friday, Sept. 4, 2020 in Washington, D.C., partially reverse a pandemic-related freeze on a wide range of immigrant and temporary visas. The U.S. issues up to 55,000 visas a year to people from countries with low representation in the U.S., many in Africa. U.S. District Court Judge Amit Mehta denied requests to take similar action on other visa categories subject to bans. (Stan Honda/Pool Photo via AP, File)
September 05, 2020 - 2:28 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — A federal judge ordered the Trump administration to resume issuing diversity visas for immigrants from underrepresented countries, partially reversing a pandemic-related freeze on a wide range of immigrant and temporary visas. The U.S. issues up to 55,000 visas a year to people...
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FILE—This Dec. 30, 2019 image from security camera video shows Michael L. Taylor, center, and George-Antoine Zayek at passport control at Istanbul Airport in Turkey. A federal judge has ruled that the Taylor and his son, accused of smuggling former Nissan Motor Co. Chairman Carlos Ghosn out of Japan while he was awaiting trial on financial misconduct charges, can be extradited. (DHA via AP)
September 04, 2020 - 1:15 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Two American men accused of smuggling Nissan Motor Co. Chairman Carlos Ghosn out of Japan while he was awaiting trial on financial misconduct charges can be extradited, a federal judge ruled Friday. U.S. Magistrate Judge Donald Cabell issued a ruling approving the extradition of...
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