Atmospheric science

FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2020, file photo, a firefighter battles the Creek Fire as it threatens homes in the Cascadel Woods neighborhood of Madera County, Calif. Climate-connected disasters seem everywhere in the crazy year 2020. But scientists Wednesday, Sept. 9, say it'll get worse. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
September 09, 2020 - 3:53 pm
A record amount of California is burning, spurred by a nearly 20-year mega-drought. To the north, parts of Oregon that don’t usually catch fire are in flames. Meanwhile, the Atlantic’s 16th and 17th named tropical storms are swirling, a record number for this time of year. Powerful Typhoon Haishen...
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FILE - In this Saturday, Sept. 5, 2020 file photo, an air tanker drops fire retardant on a hillside wildfire in Yucaipa, Calif. A hotter world is getting closer to passing a temperature limit set by global leaders five years ago and may exceed it in the next decade or so, according to a new United Nations report released on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)
September 09, 2020 - 4:04 am
The world is getting closer to passing a temperature limit set by global leaders five years ago and may exceed it in the next decade or so, according to a new United Nations report. In the next five years, the world has nearly a 1-in-4 chance of experiencing a year that’s hot enough to put the...
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FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2017, file photo, water from Addicks Reservoir flows into neighborhoods from floodwaters brought on by Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston. Nasty hurricanes that cause billions of dollars in damage are hitting more often. Laura, which is threatening the U.S. Gulf Coast, is only the latest. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
August 26, 2020 - 3:01 pm
A destructive storm is rising from warm waters. Again. America and the world are getting more frequent and bigger multibillion dollar tropical catastrophes like Hurricane Laura, which is menacing the U.S. Gulf Coast, because of a combination of increased coastal development, natural climate cycles...
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FILE - In this Monday, Aug. 17, 2020 file photo, flames from the River Fire crest a ridge in Salinas, Calif. In California, a Mediterranean climate sets up ideal conditions for fire then is worsened by climate change, says University of California, Merced, fire scientist LeRoy Westerling, who has had his home threatened twice in the last few years. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
August 20, 2020 - 8:46 am
If you want to build a fire, you need three things: Ignition, fuel and oxygen. But wildfire in California is a much more complex people-stoked witch’s brew. The state burns regularly because of fierce autumn winds, invasive grasses that act as kindling, fire-happy native shrubs and trees, frequent...
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FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2019 file photo, a woman stands next to an antenna at an NYU base camp at the Helheim glacier in Greenland. According to a study released on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2020, Greenland lost a record amount of ice during an extra warm 2019, with the melt massive enough to cover California in more than four feet (1.25 meters) of water. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 20, 2020 - 8:05 am
Greenland lost a record amount of ice during an extra warm 2019, with the melt massive enough to cover California in more than four feet (1.25 meters) of water, a new study said. After two years when summer ice melt had been minimal, last summer shattered all records with 586 billion tons (532...
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August 19, 2020 - 4:10 am
BERLIN (AP) — A German icebreaker carrying scientists on a year-long international expedition in the high Arctic has reached the North Pole, after making an unplanned detour because of lighter-than-usual sea ice conditions. Expedition leader Markus Rex said Wednesday the RV Polarstern was able to...
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August 17, 2020 - 1:14 pm
California sizzled to a triple-digit temperature so hot that meteorologists need to verify it as a planet-wide high mark. Death Valley recorded a scorching 130 degrees (54.4 degrees Celsius) Sunday, which if the sensors and other conditions check out, would be the hottest Earth has been in more...
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This July 2015 photo taken by University of Ottawa glaciology professor Luke Copland shows Canadian Ice Service ice analyst Adrienne White taking a photo of cracks of the Milne Ice Shelf, which just broke apart. The Milne ice shelf was on of the Arctic's few remaining intact ice shelves, but at the end of July 2020 about 43% broke off. Scientists say that without a doubt it's man-made global warming. (Luke Copland via AP)
August 07, 2020 - 12:38 pm
Much of Canada's remaining intact ice shelf has broken apart into hulking iceberg islands thanks to a hot summer and global warming, scientists said. Canada's 4,000-year-old Milne Ice Shelf on the northwestern edge of Ellesmere Island had been the country's last intact ice shelf until the end of...
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FILE - In this Friday, July 10, 2020 file grab taken from video provided by Russian Emergency Ministry, shows a Russian Emergency Ministry's Beriev plane BE-200 Be-200 multipurpose amphibious aircraft releasing water in the Trans-Baikal National Park in Buryatia, southern Siberia, Russia. The U.N. weather agency is warning that average temperatures in Siberia came in 10 degrees Celsius (18 Fahrenheit) above average last month, a spate of exceptional heat that has fanned devastating fires in the Arctic Circle. The high heat has also contributed to the rapid depletion of ice sea coverage off the Russian Arctic coast. World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General Petteri Taalas said the Arctic is heating more than twice as fast as the global average. WMO says the extended heat is linked to a large “blocking pressure system” and northward swing of the jet stream. (Russian Emergency Ministry Press Service via AP, File)
July 24, 2020 - 6:21 am
GENEVA (AP) — The U.N. weather agency warned Friday that average temperatures in Siberia were 10 degrees Celsius (18 Fahrenheit) above average last month, a spate of exceptional heat that has fanned devastating fires in the Arctic Circle and contributed to a rapid depletion in ice sea off Russia's...
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Wealthier neighborhoods can claim a greater share of pollution primarily because they have larger homes.
July 20, 2020 - 12:46 pm
Rich Americans produce nearly 25% more heat-trapping gases than poorer people at home, according to a comprehensive study of U.S. residential carbon footprints. Scientists studied 93 million housing units in the nation to analyze how much greenhouse gases are being spewed in different locations and...
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