Animal bites

In this Friday, May, 22, 2020 photo released by the Woodland Park Zoo shows a 2 1/2-month-old male gorilla, Kitoko, with mom Uzumm. Kitoko was injured Saturday, during a skirmish among his six-member family group in Seattle. Animal health experts say little Kitoko was bitten on the head, likely by accident when another gorilla tried to bite his mother, Uzumma. Kitoko sustained a fractured skull and a severe laceration, but zoo officials say the 2 1/2-month-old gorilla underwent surgery and may survive if he doesn't develop an infection. (Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren/Woodland Park Zoo via AP)
May 24, 2020 - 4:00 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A baby gorilla was badly injured at a Seattle zoo on Saturday when he was caught in a skirmish between his family group members, zookeepers said. Animal health experts at the Woodland Park Zoo say little Kitoko was bitten on the head, likely by accident when another gorilla tried to...
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In this undated photo provided by Cassandra Carpenter, handler Cassandra Carpenter poses with Titus, a bullmastiff. Cassandra says Titus was bitten by a snake on his back left leg in March 2019 in North Carolina. Titus went through extensive treatment and recovery and still has a scar from the episode. He is entered in the Westminster Kennel Club dog show in New York. (Amber Jade via AP)
February 11, 2020 - 11:33 am
NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on the Westminster Kennel Club dog show (all times local): 2:30 p.m. Snakebit no more! Titus the bullmastiff has won best of breed at the Westminster dog show, and will advance to the working group stage at Madison Square Garden on Tuesday night. That capped a remarkable...
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May 28, 2019 - 12:38 pm
CORAL SPRINGS, Fla. (AP) — Authorities say a ball python slithered out of a toilet and bit a South Florida man on the arm. Coral Springs police spokesman Chris Swinson said the man was treated at the scene after the 4-foot (1.2-meter) snake bit him when he lifted the toilet seat on Sunday morning...
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FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 15, 2016 file photo, a Boa Constrictors snake is seen at a museum of venomous snakes in Lima, Peru. The World Health Organization is publishing its first-ever global strategy to tackle the problem of snake bites it was announced on Thursday, May 23, 2019, aiming to halve the number of people killed and disabled by snakes by 2030. Nearly 3 million people are bitten by potentially poisonous snakes every year, resulting in as many as 138,000 deaths. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
May 23, 2019 - 9:16 am
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization is publishing its first-ever global strategy to tackle the problem of snake bites, aiming to halve the number of people killed or disabled by snakes by 2030. Nearly 3 million people are bitten by potentially poisonous snakes every year, resulting in as...
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