Access to health care

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., speaks during a confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Monday, Oct. 12, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)
October 12, 2020 - 9:09 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — To hear Democrats tell it, a Supreme Court with President Donald Trump's nominee Amy Coney Barrett could quickly get rid of the law that gives more than 20 million Americans health insurance coverage. But that's not the inevitable outcome of a challenge the court will hear Nov. 10...
Read More
Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is sworn in during a confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Monday, Oct. 12, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, Pool)
Associated Press
October 12, 2020 - 3:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett presented approach to the law as conservative and fair on Monday at the start of fast-tracked confirmation hearings, while angry Democrats, powerless to stop her, cast her as a threat to Americans’ health care coverage during the coronavirus...
Read More
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., speaks during a confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Monday, Oct. 12, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)
October 12, 2020 - 12:40 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — To hear Democrats tell it, a Supreme Court with President Donald Trump's nominee Amy Coney Barrett could quickly get rid of the law that gives more than 20 million Americans health insurance coverage. But that's not the inevitable outcome of a challenge the court will hear Nov. 10...
Read More
Melissa Wilhelm Szymanski sits with her dog Cooper at home in Glastonbury, Conn., on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020. Wilhelm Szymanski got sick earlier this year and wound up with a $3,200 bill because she wasn't diagnosed initially with COVID-19. Even though dozens of insurers and the federal government are offering to pick up all treatment costs during the pandemic, many holes remain for big bills to surprise patients. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
October 11, 2020 - 6:40 am
COVID-19 can do more than torment patients physically. It also clobbers some financially. Even though many insurers and the U.S. government have offered to pick up or waive costs tied to the virus, holes remain for big bills to slip through and surprise patients. People who weren't able to get a...
Read More
Christy DeGallerie poses for a portrait Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020, in Dallas. DeGallerie noticed a startling trend in her online group for coronavirus survivors: White patients got medications she’d never heard of, were offered X-rays and said their doctors listened to their concerns. Addressing experiences like DeGallerie's has become a priority for a growing number of local governments, many responding to a pandemic that’s amplified racial disparities and the call for racial justice after the police killing of George Floyd and other Black Americans. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
October 05, 2020 - 6:33 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Christy DeGallerie noticed a startling trend in her online group for coronavirus survivors: White patients got medications she’d never heard of, were offered X-rays and their doctors listened to their concerns. That wasn't her experience. When the 29-year-old Black woman sought a...
Read More
FILE - In this March 6, 2020, file photo, the headquarters for Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. About 2.5 million more working-age Americans were uninsured last year, even before the coronavirus pandemic struck. That's according to a study issued Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (AP Photo/ Ron Harris, File)
September 29, 2020 - 10:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — About 2.5 million more working-age Americans were uninsured last year, even before the coronavirus pandemic struck, according to a government report issued Wednesday. The study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 14.5% of adults ages 18 to 64 were...
Read More
President Donald Trump walks with Judge Amy Coney Barrett to a news conference to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
September 27, 2020 - 10:45 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is pushing for quick confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett while his Democratic rival, Joe Biden, implored the Republican-led Senate to hold off on voting on her nomination until after the Nov. 3 election to “let the people decide.” Trump's...
Read More
President Donald Trump delivers remarks on healthcare at Charlotte Douglas International Airport, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020, in Charlotte, N.C. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
September 24, 2020 - 4:05 pm
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — More than three-and-a-half years into his presidency and 40 days from an election, President Donald Trump on Thursday launched what aides termed a “vision” for health care heavy on unfulfilled aspirations. “It is affirmed, signed and done, so we can put that to rest,” Trump...
Read More
FILE - A man walks past a poster showing a US dollar outside an exchange office in Cairo, Egypt, in a Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016 file photo.In 2019, before the coronavirus pandemic hit and the U.S. economy crashed, median household income was the highest ever on record, but the number of U.S. residents without health insurance also increased, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. AP Photo/Amr Nabil, File)
September 15, 2020 - 12:51 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — In 2019, before the coronavirus pandemic hit and the U.S. economy crashed, median household income was the highest ever on record, but the number of U.S. residents without health insurance also increased, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Tuesday. Median household income in 2019...
Read More
This May 2020 photo provided by Sarah Jessop shows Natalia Linos, a Democrat candidate for the Massachusetts 4th Congressional District in the Sept. 1 primary election. Linos, a social epidemiologist and executive director of the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University, is one of many in a crowded field seeking to replace U.S. Rep. Joe Kennedy III, who is running for Senate. (Sarah Jessop via AP)
August 26, 2020 - 5:37 am
BOSTON (AP) — A background in science — specifically, infectious disease and epidemiology — may not spring to mind as a key selling point for candidates hoping to land a seat in Congress. Not unless, say, the country is in the throes of a deadly pandemic. Two Democrats in Massachusetts are...
Read More

Pages