Health

In this Aug. 16, 2010 file photo a nurse looks on from a window of the Giulesti hospital following a fire that left 5 newborn babies dead. Romanian health authorities on Friday, Nov. 30, 2018, temporarily closed the maternity hospital in the capital after over a dozen babies born there recently were diagnosed with a drug-resistant superbug. The Health Ministry said the hospital would stop admissions after the newborns were recently diagnosed with antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
December 10, 2018 - 8:05 am
BUCHAREST, Romania (AP) — The number of babies diagnosed with a drug-resistant superbug at a maternity hospital in Romania's capital has risen to 39, authorities said Monday. Raluca Alexandru, spokeswoman for Giulesti Maternity hospital, closed Nov. 30 due to the outbreak, said tests have confirmed...
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December 10, 2018 - 1:59 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — The World Health Organization says Ebola vaccinations soon will begin in South Sudan as the country is at "very high risk" in the current outbreak based in neighboring Congo. A statement says South Sudan's health ministry will begin vaccinating some health workers and other...
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FILE - In this June 21, 2018, file photo, a laboratory manager holds a cannabis sample in Oakland, Calif. Utah lawmakers are expected to meet Monday, Dec. 3, and pass changes to a voter-approved ballot measure legalizing medical marijuana, a plan that was announced as a broad compromise but has since generated backlash. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
December 04, 2018 - 4:22 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Patients can use medical marijuana legally in conservative Utah after a compromise agreement was signed into law despite concerns from advocates that it's too restrictive, but they likely won't be able to buy it legally in-state until at least 2020, officials said Tuesday. The...
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FILE - In this file photo dated Sunday, Sept. 9, 2018, health workers walk with a boy suspected as having the Ebola virus at an Ebola treatment centre in Beni, Eastern Congo. According to a WHO announcement Thursday Nov. 29, 2018, Congo’s deadly Ebola outbreak is now the second largest in history, and predicted the outbreak will last at least another six months before it can be contained. (AP Photo/Al-hadji Kudra Maliro, FILE)
December 03, 2018 - 11:04 am
GENEVA (AP) — The head of the World Health Organization says it doesn't need experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or any other U.S. government agency to fight the deadly Ebola outbreak in Congo, insisting: "We can cover it." WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus...
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In this Oct. 10, 2018, photo, scientist He Jiankui speaks during an interview in Shenzhen in southern China's Guandong province. China's government on Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018, ordered a halt to work by a medical team that claimed to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 02, 2018 - 5:12 pm
HONG KONG (AP) — Early last year, a little-known Chinese researcher turned up at an elite meeting in Berkeley, California, where scientists and ethicists were discussing a technology that had shaken the field to its core — an emerging tool for "editing" genes, the strings of DNA that form the...
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FILE - In this file photo dated Sunday, Sept. 9, 2018, health workers walk with a boy suspected as having the Ebola virus at an Ebola treatment centre in Beni, Eastern Congo. According to a WHO announcement Thursday Nov. 29, 2018, Congo’s deadly Ebola outbreak is now the second largest in history, and predicted the outbreak will last at least another six months before it can be contained. (AP Photo/Al-hadji Kudra Maliro, FILE)
November 30, 2018 - 7:09 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Global health experts are urging the Trump administration to allow U.S. government disease specialists — "some of the world's most experienced" — to return to northeastern Congo to help fight the second-largest Ebola outbreak in history. The U.S. experts have been sidelined for...
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FILE - In this Nov. 29, 2018 file photo, former mayor of New York City, Michael Bloomberg, speaks to the media in Jackson, Miss. Bloomberg’s philanthropy has announced a $50 million donation to help fight the nation’s opioid epidemic. Bloomberg Philanthropies says over the next three years it’ll help up to 10 states address the causes of opioid addiction and strengthen prevention and treatment programs. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
November 30, 2018 - 6:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's charity has announced a $50 million donation to help fight the nation's opioid epidemic. Bloomberg Philanthropies says over the next three years it'll help up to 10 states address the causes of opioid addiction and strengthen prevention...
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November 30, 2018 - 3:47 am
BUCHAREST, Romania (AP) — Romanian health authorities on Friday temporarily closed a maternity hospital in the capital after 13 babies born there recently were diagnosed with a drug-resistant superbug. The Health Ministry said the Giulesti Maternity Hospital in Bucharest would stop admissions after...
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In this Nov. 28, 2018, photo, He Jiankui, a Chinese researcher, speaks during the Human Genome Editing Conference in Hong Kong. He made his first public comments about his claim to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. The uproar over the unproven report of gene-edited births in China has researchers elsewhere worried about a backlash. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
November 29, 2018 - 10:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists working on the frontiers of medicine fear the uproar over the reported births of gene-edited babies in China could jeopardize promising research into how to alter heredity to fend off a variety of disorders. Researchers are rapidly learning how to edit DNA to fight such...
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FILE - In this Nov. 20, 2018 file photo, romaine lettuce sits on the shelves as a shopper walks through the produce area of an Albertsons market in Simi Valley, Calif. After repeated food poisoning outbreaks linked to romaine lettuce, the produce industry is confronting the failure of its own safety measures in preventing contaminations. The latest outbreak underscores the challenge of eliminating risk for vegetables grown in open fields and eaten raw. It also highlights the role of nearby cattle operations and the delay of stricter federal food safety regulations. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)
November 29, 2018 - 4:01 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — After repeated food poisoning outbreaks linked to romaine lettuce, the produce industry is confronting the failure of its own safety measures in preventing contaminations. The E. coli outbreak announced just before Thanksgiving follows one in the spring that sickened more than 200...
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