Science

FILE - In this July 16, 1969, file photo, Neil Armstrong waving in front, heads for the van that will take the crew to the rocket for launch to the moon at Kennedy Space Center in Merritt Island, Fla. When Armstrong became the first man to walk on the moon, he captured the attention and admiration of millions of people around the world. Now fans of Armstrong and of space exploration have a chance to own artifacts and mementos that belonged to the modest man who became a global hero. The personal collection of Armstrong, who died in 2012, will be offered for sale in a series of auctions handled by Dallas-based Heritage Auctions. (AP Photo/File)
July 20, 2018 - 8:10 am
CINCINNATI (AP) — Admirers of Neil Armstrong and space exploration have a chance to own artifacts and mementos that belonged to the modest man who became a global hero by becoming the first human to walk on the moon. The personal collection of Armstrong, who died in his native Ohio in 2012, will be...
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Fire Retardent is dropped on the Substation fire near where the Deschutes and Columbia Rivers meet along I-84 and SR 15 on Thursday, July 19, 2018, east of Portland. Ore. (Mark Graves/The Oregonian via AP)
July 19, 2018 - 8:04 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Farmers rushed to save their livelihoods as a wildfire roared through vast Oregon wheat fields Thursday and crushed their hopes at the peak of what was expected to be one of the most bountiful harvests in years. Farmers used water tanks on the backs of pickup trucks and...
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In this Monday, July 16, 2018 photo provided by Nathan Kam, a glow from the eruption of the Kilauea volcano is seen over Pahoa, Hawaii. The small, rural town of Pahoa is the gateway to the eruption pouring rivers of lava out of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano. But ironically it’s nearly impossible for residents and visitors on the ground to see the lava - a fact that’s squeezing the tourism-dependent local economy. (Nathan Kam via AP)
July 19, 2018 - 11:05 am
HONOLULU (AP) — Stunning images of Hawaii's erupting Kilauea volcano have captivated people around the world. But ironically it's nearly impossible for residents and visitors on the ground to see the lava — a fact that's squeezing the tourism-dependent local economy. Big Island businesses are...
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A fast-moving fire continues to rage across Wasco County southeast of The Dalles, Ore., Wednesday, July 18, 2018. Firefighters crept into the fields in water trucks and attempted to douse the leading edges of the fire from behind as it burned through acres of wheat, with everything behind the flames charred black. The region has seen drought conditions in many areas. (Mark Graves/The Oregonian via AP)
July 18, 2018 - 7:44 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A fast-moving fire fueled by gusting winds in the Pacific Northwest killed one person, forced dozens of households to evacuate and prompted Oregon Gov. Kate Brown to declare a state of emergency Wednesday. The flames near the city of The Dalles started Tuesday and expanded...
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In this photo provided by Blue Origin, The booster of the New Shepard rocket prepares to land in a project called Mission 9 (M9) in western Texas on Wednesday, July 18, 2018. Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin rocket company shot a capsule higher into space Wednesday than it's ever done before. (Blue Origina via AP)
July 18, 2018 - 5:30 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin rocket company shot a capsule higher into space Wednesday than it's ever done before. The New Shepard rocket blasted off from West Texas on the company's latest test flight. Once the booster separated, the capsule's escape motor fired, lifting the...
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This July 2018, photo provided by Charlotte Murphy shows poison parsnip in Bennington, Vt. Murphy was left with severe burns and blisters on her legs after encountering the invasive species of plant in Vermont. (Charlotte Murphy via AP)
July 18, 2018 - 4:09 pm
ESSEX, Vt. (AP) — A woman was left with severe burns and blisters on her legs after encountering an invasive species of plant in Vermont. Charlotte Murphy says she developed painful blisters overnight after brushing against poison parsnip. Murphy says the blisters got so bad she had to go to the...
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*FILE - This Sept. 4, 2011 file photo shows the main plant facility at the Navajo Generating Station northeast of Grand Canyon National Park as seen from Lake Powell in Page, Ariz. A new study concludes visitors may be steering clear of some U.S. national parks or cutting their visits short because of pollution. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
July 18, 2018 - 12:07 pm
DENVER (AP) — Visitors appear to be steering clear of some U.S. national parks or cutting visits short because of pollution levels that are comparable to what's found in major cities, according to a study released Wednesday. Researchers at Iowa State and Cornell universities looked at more than two...
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July 18, 2018 - 8:11 am
KODIAK, Alaska (AP) — A California-based rocket company has shortlisted the spaceport in Kodiak, Alaska, as a possible permanent home for its launches. Rocket Lab announced Tuesday that it's seeking to build a launch complex in the U.S. to complement its current site in New Zealand, the Kodiak...
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FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2016, file photo, Tesla CEO Elon Musk listens as President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with technology industry leaders at Trump Tower in New York. Musk has apologized for calling a British diver involved in the Thailand cave rescue a pedophile. In a series of tweets late Tuesday, the Tesla CEO said he had "spoken in anger" on Sunday after diver Vern Unsworth accused Musk of orchestrating a "PR stunt" by sending a small submarine to help divers rescue the soccer players and their coach from a cave. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
July 18, 2018 - 5:45 am
BANGKOK (AP) — Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has apologized for calling a British diver involved in the Thailand cave rescue a pedophile, saying he spoke in anger but was wrong to do so. There was no immediate public reaction from diver Vern Unsworth to Musk's latest tweets . Musk's initial tweet...
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FILE--In this Aug. 11, 2017 file photo, visitors approach a former ranch house and barn during a guided hike on the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge near Denver, land that used to be a buffer zone around a nuclear weapons plant. Environmentalists and community activists are trying to stop the refuge from opening to the public this summer, claiming the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service did not adequately study the safety of the site. (AP Photo/Dan Elliott, File)
July 17, 2018 - 6:13 pm
DENVER (AP) — A retired professor testified Tuesday he found evidence that billions of particles of plutonium had escaped from a former nuclear weapons plant in Colorado and settled on land that is now a wildlife refuge, raising concerns about whether the site is safe for the public. But an...
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