Science

FILE - In this Dec. 7, 2008, file photo, Nobel Prize in Chemistry laureate Osamu Shimomura speaks during the press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden. Shimomura, one of three scientists who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for the discovery and development of a jellyfish protein that contributed to cancer studies, has died in Japan’s southern city of Nagasaki where he studied as a student. He was 90. His alma mater Nagasaki University said Monday, Oct. 22, 2018, that Shimomura died Friday of natural causes.(AP Photo/Scanpix, Fredrik Persson, File)
October 21, 2018 - 10:53 pm
TOKYO (AP) — Japanese-born Marine biologist Osamu Shimomura, who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry, has died. He was 90. His alma mater Nagasaki University said Monday that Shimomura died Friday of natural causes. Shimomura and two American scientists shared the 2008 Nobel prize for the discovery...
Read More
FILE - In this July 18, 2018, file photo, lawyers and youth plaintiffs lineup behind a banner after a hearing before Federal District Court Judge Ann Aiken between lawyers for the Trump Administration and the so called Climate Kids in Federal Court in Eugene, Ore. The U.S. government is trying once again to block a major climate change lawsuit days before young activists are set to argue at trial that the government has violated their constitutional rights by failing to take action climate change. On Thursday, Oct. 18, 2018, the Justice Department for a second time this year asked the U.S. Supreme Court to dismiss the case. The high court in July denied the request as premature. (Chris Pietsch/The Register-Guard via AP, File)
October 19, 2018 - 5:22 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday temporarily blocked a high-profile climate change lawsuit brought by young activists who accuse the federal government of violating their constitutional rights with policies that have caused a dangerous climate. Chief Justice John Roberts signed an...
Read More
October 19, 2018 - 4:46 am
BERLIN (AP) — Final preparations were underway Friday for the launch of a joint mission by European and Japanese space agencies to send twin probes to Mercury, the closest planet to the sun. An Ariane 5 rocket is scheduled to lift the uncrewed spacecraft into orbit from French Guiana shortly before...
Read More
FILE- In this Dec. 13, 2011, file photo Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen looks across at a model of a giant airplane and spaceship he plans on building, during a news conference about the plane in Seattle. Prior to his death on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018, Allen invested large sums in technology ventures, research projects and philanthropies, some of them eclectic and highly speculative. Outside of bland assurances from his investment company, no one seems quite sure what happens now. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
October 18, 2018 - 3:27 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Prior to his death on Monday, billionaire Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen invested large sums in technology ventures, research projects and philanthropy, some of it eclectic and highly speculative. What happens to those commitments now? Outside of bland assurances from his investment...
Read More
FILE - This Sept. 13, 2011 file photo shows a computer replication of the 6.7 magnitude Northridge Earthquake of 1994 during a demonstration of an early earthquake warning system at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif. Developers testing an earthquake early warning system for the West Coast say its alerts are ready to be used much more broadly, but not for mass public notification. U.S. Geological Survey official Doug Given told reporters Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018 at Caltech that the ShakeAlert system has transitioned from a production prototype to operational mode. The system is being built for California, Oregon and Washington. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)
October 17, 2018 - 5:08 pm
PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — Automated alerts from the fledgling West Coast earthquake early warning system are ready to be used broadly by businesses, utilities, schools and other entities but not for mass public notification, officials said Wednesday. "We're making a large change from a production...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan 21, 2018, file photo provided by Rocket Lab, electron rocket carrying only a small payload of about 150 kilograms (331 pounds), lifts off from the Mahia Peninsula on New Zealand's North Island's east coast. A California-based startup says it will rocket small satellites into orbit from Virginia. (Rocket Lab via AP, File)
October 17, 2018 - 1:00 pm
NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — A California-based startup said Wednesday that it will rocket small satellites into orbit from Virginia, an endeavor that reflects increasing demand from companies and governments alike to monitor ships, crops and the weather from space. Rocket Lab said it will build its launch...
Read More
FILE - In this July 2012 photo provided by Laure Gauthiez, scientists Vickie Bennett, Allen Nutman and Clark Friend examine rocks in Greenland. A new study says what were billed as the oldest fossils on Earth may just be some rocks. Two years ago, a team of Australian scientists, including Nutman, found odd structures in Greenland that they said were partly a leftover from microbes that lived on an ancient seafloor. The tiny structures were said to be 3.7 billion years old. But different researchers concluded in a study published Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018, that the structures were likely not fossils. The Australian scientists defended their work. (Laure Gauthiez/The Australian National University via AP, File)
October 17, 2018 - 10:48 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — What were billed as the oldest fossils on Earth may just be some rocks, according to a new study. Two years ago, a team of Australian scientists found odd structures in Greenland that they said were partly leftovers from microbes that lived on an ancient seafloor. They were said...
Read More
FILE - In this April 30, 2014, file photo, Dustin Shaw lifts debris as he searches through what is left of his sister's house at Parkwood Meadows neighborhood after a tornado in Vilonia, Ark. A new study finds that tornado activity is generally shifting eastward to areas just east of the Mississippi River that are more vulnerable such as Mississippi, Arkansas and Tennessee. And it's going down in Oklahoma, Kansas and Texas. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)
October 17, 2018 - 3:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Over the past few decades tornadoes have been shifting — decreasing in Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas but spinning up more in states along the Mississippi River and farther east, a new study shows. Scientists aren't quite certain why. Tornado activity is increasing most in Mississippi...
Read More
October 15, 2018 - 4:14 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Raye Montague, a trailblazing black woman from Arkansas who revolutionized the way the U.S. Navy designed ships, has died. She was 83. Montague, who had a 33-year career in the Navy, developed a computer program that created rough drafts of ship specifications. She told the...
Read More
FILE - This June 1, 2014, file photo show the coal-fired Plant Scherer in operation in Juliette, Ga. Despite what President Donald Trump says, scientists have long known that what's warming the planet isn't natural. It's us. Climate scientists say Trump was wrong. There are several ways they know that more than 90 percent of climate change is caused by emissions of heat-trapping gases from activities like burning coal and natural gas for electricity, or burning gasoline, diesel and jet fuel for transportation. In other words, humans. (AP Photo/John Amis, File)
October 15, 2018 - 3:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite what President Donald Trump says, scientists have long known that what's warming the planet isn't natural. It's us. They even have the energy balance sheets accounting for changes in the climate to prove it. President Trump's own White House put out a science report last...
Read More

Pages